HOW TO MAKE TIE DYE CANDLES
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Tie dye candles are some of the most beautiful candles you can
make.  These candles are an advanced project and require that
you get out of the candle making box and adventure a bit!  The
finished product is worth the work and we will break it all down
below!

For this project, you will need:  
Wax Pitcher; Wick; Candle Making
Thermometer
; Scent and Color; Double Boiler Maker ; Metal
Candle Mold
(we are using our trusty 3" diameter by 4" tall round
mold) ;
mold sealing magnet ; wick bar (included with metal molds)
and a small sheet of aluminum foil.  You may also want to have a
stainless steel funnel and a sharp knife.  Also used in this project
are a couple of cheap spoons, a water bath and several
flexible
mold weights.
For the first step of this project, melt your wax using the double
boiler maker method
.  For this project, we will be using uncolored
premium candle wax.  These candles come out their best if you
use paraffin wax and don't color it.  Paraffin is slightly translucent
and will really allow your tie dye effect to show through later.


We will begin this project with our mold wicked and ready to go.  
We use a mold sealing magnet to seal the bottom of the mold.  
Mold sealer is not recommended for this project as the high
temperature wax you will pour later can melt and compromise a
putty seal.  If you need help getting your mold set up, refer to our
basic metal mold instructions.
This project starts pretty much the same as a chunk candle.  
We will make our uncolored chunks using a technique we have
worked with before.  We used a small sheet of aluminum foil
and folded it up into a shallow tray.  You can use
chunk molds
or any other methods you choose to make your chunks.  We
like to use these aluminum trays as they are super cheap,
convenient and disposable.
Once your wax is melted, add scent if you so desire.  We like to
scent our wax prior to making chunks to ensure the finished
candle has maximum scent.  Slowly pour you wax into the tray
until it's full.
The wax in your tray will cool pretty quickly due to the
large surface area.  When it's mostly set, you can use a
knife to draw score lines through the wax.  Score lines will
help you to break up the wax into chunks with less effort.
After your wax slab is fully set, you can pull it out of the tray and break it up
into chunks and you're ready to go!
Once your water bath is ready to roll, pull the mold out and fill it
with the chunks you previously made.  As much as is possible,
arrange the chunks so they don't press against and displace the
wick you previously set and centered.  We use zinc cored wick to
help ensure the wick stays as straight as possible during the
candle making process.  Fill your mold with chunks until they are
about 1/2" below the lip of the mold - the same level as water in
your bath will reach as tested above.
Prior to moving on, you will want to prepare your water
bath.   You can use almost any container for this purpose,
so long as it's large enough to comfortable hold your
mold.   We got this stock pot at a local thrift store for less
than $10.  

We added three flexible mold weights to our mold,
wrapping them around the base.  These weights will hold
the candle down in the water bath later as it sets.  Without
enough mold weights, the candle mold will float in the
water, tip over and ruin all of your hard work!
Use this step to test and adjust the level of water in your
bath.   You will want the water level to be about 1/2" lower
than the lip of the mold as it sits in the water.  This helps to
ensure no water accidentally gets into the mold as you
lower it in later.  This step also allows you to make sure the
seal of your mold magnet is complete.  If there are leaks,
water will seep into the mold.  If you see water, dry the
mold out, adjust your seal and try again.  This is CRITICAL
because, later, when you pour wax, an incomplete seal will
mean hot wax spills all over the place and makes a horrible
mess.
At this point, you are ready to go!   Have your mold and
water bath in close proximity to each other as you don't
want to be holding and carrying a mold full of hot wax any
farther than you need to!
Now, you are going to melt your wax over DIRECT HEAT.  
A candle making thermometer is an ABSOLUTE MUST for
this project.  Heating wax over direct heat is VERY
DANGEROUS if you don't continually track the wax's
temperature.  NEVER allow your wax to exceed it's flash
point - generally around 300 degrees F.  Wax that gets
hotter than this temperature could spontaneously burst
into flames and cause a devastating fire.  We can't say it
enough - USE A THERMOMETER AND NEVER LET YOUR
WAX REACH IT'S FLASH POINT!

For this project to work, and the color you add later to
disperse properly, the wax needs to be very hot.  We
poured at 260 degrees for this project.
Once your wax reaches its pour temperature, remove from heat and
set aside.  It will stay in the pouring temperature range for several
minutes.  Melt your dye chips by heating the spoons with a lighter or
other heat source.  Heat until the dye chips fully melt into liquid.  Be
careful how you rest them as you don't want a spoon full of liquid dye
chip to tip over and spill it's contents!   We propped ours up on our
double boiler maker to make sure they didn't spill.
We will be adding two colors to our tie dye candle, green and
cinnamon red.  These colors are available in our large selection of
dye chips.  Never use spoons you will use to eat for this project.  We
picked up these two spoons at the local thrift store for 25 cents each!

Put one dye chip on each spoon.
Pour your wax into the mold, filling until the top of the exposed
chunks are just covered.
As quickly as possible, add drops of your melted color chips
to the edges of the mold, spacing the drops about 1" apart.  
We added three drops of green first.  As soon as the drops hit
the super hot wax, you will see that the start to sink into the
wax.  When you don't see (yet) is how the colors snake
between the wax chunks you added previously, leaving color
trails throughout the candle.
After you add your first color, repeat the process with your
second color, adding drops in the spaces left between the
green drops.  You will see the colors remain largely separated
as they trickle down into the mold.  So long as you don't shake
or agitate the mold, the colors will remain distinct as they set
later.
BEFORE YOUR HANDLE THE WAX FILLED MOLD, PUT
ON GLOVES THAT WILL PROTECT YOUR HANDS
FROM THE HEAT.  REMEMBER THAT YOUR MOLD IS
GOING TO BE EXTREMELY HOT AT THIS POINT AND
YOU CAN NOT SAFELY HANDLE IT WITH BARE HANDS!

Wait approximately 60 seconds after you add your
second color to allow the dyes to percolate all through the
mold.   Then, carefully lift the mold and slowly transfer it
into the water bath, lowering it gently and slowly to ensure
no water splashes into the mold.  The cool water in the
bath causes the wax to set very quickly around the edges
of the candle, trapping the tie dye effect of the color
moving through and around the candle.
As paraffin wax cools, a well will form.  This is normal and
expected.  Using a water bath and extremely hot wax, the
well will be deeper than you may be used to seeing.  This
is no cause to worry.   Simply refill the well using whatever
wax you have set in reserve from your original batch.  You
may need to refill a few times to ensure the finished candle
has a nice level bottom.  We refilled twice and were very
satisfied with the results.
Once your candle is fully set (it took about four hours using a
cool water bath for our project) slide it out of the mold and
expect to be wowed!   Add a tab, should you choose to do so,
trim the wick and you have an amazing candle that will
definitely catch eyes!